2022 Grad Show

Sabine Levesque

AUArts Grad Show sap

Drawing

We're All Stuffed Anyways

Stuff, Stuff, Stuff
Will make you happy
The more the better
Stuff yourself like a turkey dinner
Remove your guts to make room for more stuffing
Hurry up
There is never enough stuff, stuff, stuff

What is stuff?

Coat(ing)

The fibres from the Filipino abaca plant, the Japanese kozo plant, and various types of cotton, are combined into a pulp mixture used to form handmade sheets of paper. The papers are molded onto the bark of a tree, creating an imprint that mimics a tough outer skin onto the fragile paper. These sheets of paper are then sewn into a garment. Sap, the blood of the tree, drips down the papers, spreading and sticking to the skin of the wearer over time. This play between strength and fragility, human and environment, is a man-made replication of nature. The paradox of this recreation is brought to light in a world where nature is reduced to a commodity.

Prototype

Inspired by the principles of cradle to cradle, I challenged myself to create a garment made from a handmade, biodegradable, low waste fabric. Using water, vegetable glycerin, agar agar and eco-dye, I was able to create a “bio-leather”. This garment is a prototype, however, the appeal of this material I have created is that once it has reached the end of its life, an opportunity for rebirth presents itself through its ability to be boiled down and become the start of something new.

Send Carbon ?

Humans are sophisticated, but so is nature. Send Carbon? monumentalizes mycelium and the intricacies of plant communication through a comparison to human communication and technology. The structure of the sculpture reflects the multitude of tangled branches that make up mycelium, while the materials (yarn and LED lights) speak to other, more human forms of language, such as textile and technology. This work is inspired by Suzanne Simard, who proved that trees in a forest can respond to the needs of other plants around them by sending carbon and other nutrients through the mycelium network.